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Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

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Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby superhero81 » Tue Nov 19, 2013 5:09 am

Hi,
What is the best way to monitor GR (Gain Reduction)
when using a Nebula Compressor?
It's easy with VST plugins because most of them have it on the plugin. I heard not to go by Nebula's GR meter?
Any help and advice would be great!
Thanks
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby botus99 » Sat Nov 23, 2013 12:45 am

Best way to monitor gain reduction is with your ears :mrgreen:

You can still kind of follow the GR meter in Nebula as a rough guideline most times
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby mmarra » Sun Nov 24, 2013 3:52 am

I am also looking for a way or good skin to monitor GR when I use a Nebula compressor...any suggestions on skins?
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby ngarjuna » Sun Nov 24, 2013 4:08 am

mmarra wrote:I am also looking for a way or good skin to monitor GR when I use a Nebula compressor...any suggestions on skins?

I'm not sure that Nebula skin meters can be configured for GR; but if they can I would be willing to redo one of my skins with one of the meters assigned to GR.

Giancarlo or Enrique: is this possible?
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby Cupwise » Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:12 pm

actually not too long ago an update was released just to add that ability into the skins. at least i know it was released for acqua format but i think that means it's incorporated into nebula too..
check beta forums ngarjuna, i'm pretty sure it was announced in there

one thing- i don't personally feel that the program template for compressors gives a really accurate gain reduction meter, so if a program hasn't had it tweaked beyond that default setup, the reduction level shown 'sticks' for a while. beyond that there are a few other adjustments that can throw the reading off. so it really comes down to the program and how well it was 'calibrated'. i think it can be very accurate.
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby giancarlo » Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:11 am

yes it's a feature introduced recently
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby giancarlo » Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:11 am

yes it's a feature introduced recently
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby ngarjuna » Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:22 am

Hmm interesting. Well if someone can hook me up with the syntax I'd be willing to alter one of my skins with 2 meters so that one is input and one is GR.

To be perfectly honest I find GR meters fairly useless myself; the numerical amount that something is being compressed is totally arbitrary and doesn't correspond to how something might sound. It will tell you if you're crushing the life out of something but your ears should probably be setting off alarms long before the meters reach that point. Other than telling you that the threshold has been breeched (and that compression is taking place), something you can get from the extant numerical readout, I don't really get why people always seem to ask about it.

But my suspicion is that it will be pretty easy to implement on an already finished meter/skin and this is not the first time I've seen the request so...like I said, willing to give it a shot.
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby brp » Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:22 pm

i for myself tweak every compressor program i use. there is definitely big improvement possible for most programs out there, especially for old ones.

for adjustments make sure that you're on the program page on nebula; press edit; go to the EVFS page;

i find the following adjustments quit useful:

EVFS go to page <<2>>
------------------------------------------
Env Type: EVF 17
Att Min: 300 ms
Att Max: 300 ms
Att Sc: OFF Dyn Att Sc: OFF
Rel Min: 300 ms
Rel Max: 300 ms
Rel Sc: OFF Dyn Rel Sc: OFF
I/O Bal: 0%
Highpass: 0Hz O:2 Highpass Sc: OFF
------------------------------------------
EVFS go to page <<3>>
------------------------------------------
Env Type: EVF 17
Att Min: 300 ms
Att Max: 300 ms
Att Sc: OFF Dyn Att Sc: OFF
Rel Min: 300 ms
Rel Max: 300 ms
Rel Sc: OFF Dyn Rel Sc: OFF
I/O Bal: 100%
Highpass: 0Hz O:2 Highpass Sc: OFF
------------------------------------------

if you like other timings, change it to your needs. just make sure that all the "Att"/"Rel" parameters on page 2 and page 3 must have the same length although "Att" can be different than "Rel".

have fun!
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Re: Best way to monitor gain reduction when using Nebula?

Postby brp » Tue Nov 26, 2013 11:09 pm

@ngarjuna

i see things about the benefit of gr-meter allmost the same like you, especially in the nebula world. while on a real hardware box the needle shows you exactly what the vca is doing, nebula kind of guesses the action by comparing two envelopefollower, one before and one after the process.

so a reasonable implementation of a gr meter for nebula would actually be just one or two LEDs like on the D*x 160a. they just indicate if the signal hits the threshold. such indicators as well as a full meter are quite useful, not to tell how the comp is sounding, but to tell if it is working. of course one can and should hear this too while tweaking it. but imagin a chanelstrip with five or more plugins and you're hearing something's wrong. now the meter will be able to tell you quickly wether you'd have to search the fault within nebula or elswhere! thats what meters mainly are made for in my opinion, faster troubleshooting ;-)
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