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How to get that "Vintage" Reggae Dub sound ?

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Re: How to get that "Vintage" Reggae Dub sound ?

Postby seabstudio » Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:57 am

elam wrote:I just finish a "similar" production.Late 70's roots and culture.(not dub).

You should be there with what you got already plus all the good advices here.I bought SDRR at the very end of the session and didn't have time to use it for that.But I'm pretty sure you can come close to that hi hat sizzle with it.(support Tony who is also a Nebula user).

From the top of my head, I use Cupwise spring reverb and chose the shittiest one,extra drippy.I wanted to hear those springs! (The Gibbs-I don't remember how Tim calls it,but check,it's a wonderful library.).Spring reverb is crucial for the Roots sound for me.

I'm agree that Nebula can't saturate (or maybe stacking 6 instances)like that yet.So if ITB, use amp sims, pedal sims,tape sims,and don't be shy.

I remember that I used Ferrox AND Reelbus from Tone Booster to make it even more dirty at the very end.And I push them hard.

Last: I don't remember where I heard that,but from my experience it's true.Your dub has to come from a good/great reggae song.It's fundamental.I should add,great players.Especially the bass.You or him have to really be reggae and feel this music.Even if you're from Finland.

... Or you will end up with some half-ass cold hearted roots music.Good luck.


I'am totally agree with you .
The players is very important , the groove / the feal too .
I love Reggae music about long time , i play my own instruments
For exemple I "recut" this riddim , and a lot of old veteran tune will be arrived soon .I work for Irieites compagny

Dubwise : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48tGkCLOOQk

Original : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTsk76ABd5w

I'm not a "real" drummer but a Finger drummer :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxIsgyKbYr4
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Re: How to get that "Vintage" Reggae Dub sound ?

Postby beingmf » Wed Oct 09, 2013 4:33 pm

timp wrote:Speaking of which I'm creating a new library for drive.It gets that purring bass that you hear on some of those records.

If you want I can process some audio for you to hear the progress if you so wish.


Tim, that's great to hear! Now the only missing link program is up to Henry :D : the back of a 15" cabinet, fed by a Fender Twin!
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Re: How to get that "Vintage" Reggae Dub sound ?

Postby Tim Petherick » Fri Oct 11, 2013 2:04 am

hey seabstudio,

I pm'd you.. ;)


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Re: How to get that "Vintage" Reggae Dub sound ?

Postby RE301 » Sat Aug 22, 2015 5:53 pm

Hi - a little late to the party, but this is an interesting subject.. :-)

I love that vintage 70's Jamaican sound! ...I think the most important part of the equation in the sound of that 70's stuff is what happened on the front end! The musicians, sound & tuning of the instruments, location, studio, atmosphere / energy /personalities in the studio, the historical times, etc... also they used to track in an 'old school' way with basic tracks going down live / everyone playing at the same time so you get a different vibe to the performances plus technical things like sound leakage on mics etc...

I think its reasonable to presume that a lot of the sound / tone with those recordings went to tape that way on the first place given the use generally of limited track counts in JA during those days..though I think Channel One studio later had a 16trk (and submixing to 4 track for any later mixing/voicing at King Tubby)..

On Channel One: a JA engineer told me he thought it was a miracle stuff came out of there sounding as good as it did as (supposedly) the recording room was, according to them, a horrible-sounding concrete/masonry box...

I also heard from CH 1 drummer Sly Dunbar that he and the house engineer spent months experimenting with positioning the drums in the room to find the right spot & also with tuning, mics, board settings etc.. to finally get the 'sound'..

The engineer Scientist has also remarked in public (on FB) that when he used to mix at Channel One, he set the gain staging on the A*I desk so the master VU's barely moved (must have had a good noise floor at that studio!) .. :-0 which goes contrary to the usual idea of smashing all levels to the max as the 'thing to do'... :-0

I've also heard, but don't know if its true, the tape machine was never maintained at CH 1 & they had no alignment tape.. :-0


And thanks to YT we can actually 'travel in time' back to the 70's and visit these studios during the PEAK (my guess is all this footage is from around 1977) !


Prince Jammy mixing Jailhouse Rock @ King Tubby's
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-KsWcv6YnM

Mighty Diamonds @ Channel One
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLkZgugz5is

Culture @ (probably) Joe Gibbs Studio...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLPhur2jgqE

And the best of all - Lee Perry in session at the Black Ark!! :-)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y651C7aNXRc
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Re: How to get that "Vintage" Reggae Dub sound ?

Postby seabstudio » Thu Sep 17, 2015 11:51 pm

RE301 wrote:Hi - a little late to the party, but this is an interesting subject.. :-)

I love that vintage 70's Jamaican sound! ...I think the most important part of the equation in the sound of that 70's stuff is what happened on the front end! The musicians, sound & tuning of the instruments, location, studio, atmosphere / energy /personalities in the studio, the historical times, etc... also they used to track in an 'old school' way with basic tracks going down live / everyone playing at the same time so you get a different vibe to the performances plus technical things like sound leakage on mics etc...

I think its reasonable to presume that a lot of the sound / tone with those recordings went to tape that way on the first place given the use generally of limited track counts in JA during those days..though I think Channel One studio later had a 16trk (and submixing to 4 track for any later mixing/voicing at King Tubby)..

On Channel One: a JA engineer told me he thought it was a miracle stuff came out of there sounding as good as it did as (supposedly) the recording room was, according to them, a horrible-sounding concrete/masonry box...

I also heard from CH 1 drummer Sly Dunbar that he and the house engineer spent months experimenting with positioning the drums in the room to find the right spot & also with tuning, mics, board settings etc.. to finally get the 'sound'..

The engineer Scientist has also remarked in public (on FB) that when he used to mix at Channel One, he set the gain staging on the A*I desk so the master VU's barely moved (must have had a good noise floor at that studio!) .. :-0 which goes contrary to the usual idea of smashing all levels to the max as the 'thing to do'... :-0

I've also heard, but don't know if its true, the tape machine was never maintained at CH 1 & they had no alignment tape.. :-0


And thanks to YT we can actually 'travel in time' back to the 70's and visit these studios during the PEAK (my guess is all this footage is from around 1977) !


Prince Jammy mixing Jailhouse Rock @ King Tubby's
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-KsWcv6YnM

Mighty Diamonds @ Channel One
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLkZgugz5is

Culture @ (probably) Joe Gibbs Studio...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLPhur2jgqE

And the best of all - Lee Perry in session at the Black Ark!! :-)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y651C7aNXRc



Really true & tks for contribution !
I wait 6 month before sampling my live drum for my upcoming vst software ( Rubaddrum )...the tuning / mic positioning / room is really important and complicated to understand , you have to be very patient and passionate :)

I saw a JA recording studio photo with the drum in the corner of the room with small " drum booth " ( just around the kit ) , I think is a good part of drum sound too, dead room to record and limit spill from other instrument and then apply FX / saturation etc ...

Sly Dunbar talk about Phidadelphia records and the drummer Earl Young ( who inspire him at this period ) ,.
He have a good feel ( especially on hat groove ) but a "cardbox" sound drum …
At this moment Sly asked to Ernest Hoo Kim to find this sound and apply it to reggae music . Another sound of reggae was born with this man

Personally i don't like to heard my drum "naturally" but when i listen the result after recording , it's nearly like a drum machine sample shot , very powerful and precise.
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Re: How to get that "Vintage" Reggae Dub sound ?

Postby seabstudio » Fri Sep 18, 2015 12:02 am

RE301 wrote:
I've also heard, but don't know if its true, the tape machine was never maintained at CH 1 & they had no alignment tape.. :-0

I think they use the bias trick technique or eq bias trick ( just records what you hear)
I test it on my revox PR99MK3 ...with a bass for exemple ..try to over-bias your machine ( depend to tape formula ) it "kill" the hiss , add a lot of harmonic distorsion and tape compress flavor, this is sound of reggae bass for me :) , try different setting on hat / snare etc ...it awesome

If you don't have a real tape , Satin vst have a lot of setting like this , you can hear the difference with your instrument , very informative !

If i know how to create this library on Nebula , i'll do it !

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Re: How to get that "Vintage" Reggae Dub sound ?

Postby seabstudio » Fri Sep 18, 2015 12:02 am

seabstudio wrote:
RE301 wrote:
I've also heard, but don't know if its true, the tape machine was never maintained at CH 1 & they had no alignment tape.. :-0


I think they use the bias trick technique or eq bias trick ( just records what you hear)
I test it on my revox PR99MK3 ...with a bass for exemple ..try to over-bias your machine ( depend to tape formula ) it "kill" the hiss , add a lot of harmonic distorsion and tape compress flavor, this is sound of reggae bass for me :) , try different setting on hat / snare etc ...it awesome

If you don't have a real tape , Satin vst have a lot of setting like this , you can hear the difference with your instrument , very informative !

If i know how to create this library on Nebula , i'll do it !
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