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When do you use Liquidity?

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When do you use Liquidity?

Postby daveedwards » Sat Oct 13, 2012 7:46 pm

I've been using Nebula for a few months now, mostly for preamps, eq, and saturation, and I've never really touched the liquidity dial. I read the FAQ page but I'm still a bit confused as to when this should and shouldn't be used. Do you guys have any tips?

Thanks!
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Re: When do you use Liquidity?

Postby botus99 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 8:45 pm

I wish I could give a more detailed response, but as far as I know it's always best to leave it alone to best preserve the original character of the given program
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Re: When do you use Liquidity?

Postby enriquesilveti » Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:53 pm

Liquidity is a parameter which controls the way in which kernels are mixed together in the time domain and is implemented through Acustica Audio SMOOTH technology. Only use if you listen clicks or noises.
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Re: When do you use Liquidity?

Postby Cupwise » Tue Oct 16, 2012 4:25 am

yeah. for the most part i think liquidity shouldn't be a control on the front panel. if the dev tested the program, there shouldn't be clicks, and if there are, the dev should maybe set the liquidity themselves and it should be hidden from the end user so as to avoid confusion. that's just my opinion, and from now on i'm probably going to remove the control from most of my stuff.

BUT-
there ARE a few cases where it could come in handy though. for example, a filter program, when you intend to do automation/filter sweeps with it. or basically any kind of program where there's a sampled control, and you intend to automate it in some way. the liquidity is then basically just a 'smooth' control, which you can add a little of to smooth out the sound of the automation. it basically just prevents the changes from happening faster than whatever you set it to. so it's like a 'slew rate' kind of thing basically. another example of this type of use is with my tremolo set, some of the presets use the random LFO. so if you increase liquidity there, the jump from one position to another is smoothed out, instead of being so quick and instant. any type of situation like that, where you are automating (either directly or with an LFO) something that was sampled, it could be useful.
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Re: When do you use Liquidity?

Postby enriquesilveti » Tue Oct 16, 2012 11:36 am

Extra information:

18.1. Envelope follower in Nebula

An envelope detector is sometimes referred to as an envelope follower in musical environments. It is still used to detect the amplitude variations of an incoming signal to produce a control signal that resembles those variations.
Nebula use an envelope follower to translate incoming amplitude audio signal into a value that help to select the correct kernel that will process the incoming signal with the correct filter but this filter has a length that is more than one sample that is the reason that Nebula or any signal modeling processor can emulate correctly a peak limiter with out introduce audible distortion.
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Re: When do you use Liquidity?

Postby lipa » Sat Oct 20, 2012 1:22 am

I don't know much.. but in the new analog in the box reverbs liquidity can be used to change the reverb sound (it's in the manual).. I've noticed in different reverb programs (free pcm library) it changes the sound of modulation in reverb tail a little.. (adding liquidity reduced amount and depth of modulation to my ears)..
..didnt touch it in any other libraries.. ;)
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Re: When do you use Liquidity?

Postby enriquesilveti » Sat Oct 20, 2012 7:14 pm

Can be, it's a lineal fader between kernels...
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Re: When do you use Liquidity?

Postby Cupwise » Sat Oct 20, 2012 11:46 pm

lipa wrote:I don't know much.. but in the new analog in the box reverbs liquidity can be used to change the reverb sound (it's in the manual).. I've noticed in different reverb programs (free pcm library) it changes the sound of modulation in reverb tail a little.. (adding liquidity reduced amount and depth of modulation to my ears)..
..didnt touch it in any other libraries.. ;)


the type of modulation used in many reverbs (pitch modulation/chorus) can't be done by nebula. i don't doubt you are hearing some kind of effect by increasing liq, but there isn't pitch mod going on there. liquidity in the case of a reverb is only going to be working on the change between the sampled dynamic steps, so i imagine that's where the change in sound is coming from. in other words, more liquidity means the reverbs become 'less dynamic'.
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